International Archaeological Discovery Award “Khaled al-Asaad” (2nd edition)

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    International Archaeological Discovery Award “Khaled al-Asaad” (1st edition)
    International Archaeological Discovery Award “Khaled al-Asaad” (3rd edition)

    The second edition of the International Archaeological Discovery Award “Khaled al-Asaad” was awarded to the Celtic Tomb in France as the most significant discovery of 2015: the Prize was delivered to the INRAP Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives, President Dominique Garcia, on Friday, 28 October, in the presence of archaeologist Fayrouz Asaad and daughter of Khaled al-Asaad.

    The “Special Award”, the award with the greatest consensus on the Facebook page of the BMTA, is assigned to the Etruscan Tomb of Città della Pieve: a discovery of fundamental value for Pievese territory, which will thus become part of the network of Cities Etruscan.

    In the second edition, the five archaeological discoveries selected are:

    1. CELTIC TOMB IN LAVAU – France
    2. 22 SUBMERGED WRECKS IN FOURNI ARCHIPELAGO – Greece
    3. UNDERGROUND MONUMENT NEAR STONEHENGE – England
    4. ETRUSCAN TOMB IN CITTA’ DELLA PIEVE – Italy
    5. TOMBS OF NECROPOLIS OF KHALET AL-JAM’A – Palestine

    Dominique Garcia riceve il premio della II edizione dal Sottosegretario MiBACT Ilaria Borletti Buitoni e da Fayrouz Asaad

    Dominique Garcia riceve il premio della II edizione dal Sottosegretario MiBACT Ilaria Borletti Buitoni e da Fayrouz Asaad

    Cerimonia di consegna dell'International Archaeological Discovery Award Khaled Asaad

    Cerimonia di consegna dell’International Archaeological Discovery Award “Khaled Al Asaad”

    Il Premio "Special Award" assegnato a Città della Pieve

    Il Premio “Special Award” assegnato alla Tomba Etrusca di Città della Pieve

     

    1. CELTIC TOMB IN LAVAU – France

    TOMBA CELTICA A LAVAU, Francia

    TOMBA CELTICA A LAVAU, Francia

    A tomb dating back to the fith century B.C., with the remains of a celtic prince, has been discovered in Lavau in the Champagne region, 100 km from Paris. The discovery was announced on Twitter even by French Prime Minister Manuel Valls with pictures of the site, larger than the Cathedral of Troyes. When a large knife was found, the President of INRAP Dominique Garcia reported that it was probably the funerary monument of a local celtic prince. At the centre of the 40 mt diameter mound, the deceased and his altar rest in a vast funerary chamber of 14 square meters, one of the largest discovered dating to the early Iron Age. The tomb contains a wealth of funerary deposits worthy of the highest élite of the time: the main piece is a bronze cauldron, about one meter in diameter, decorated around the handles with depictions of the head of the greek god Acheloos. The artifact must be the work of a greek or etruscan craftsman.

    2. 22 SUBMERGED WRECKS IN FOURNI ARCHIPELAGO – Greece

    22 RELITTI SOTTOMARINI NELL’ARCIPELAGO DI FOURNI, Grecia

    22 RELITTI SOTTOMARINI NELL’ARCIPELAGO DI FOURNI, Grecia

    Offshore in the Aegean sea, in the Fourni archipelago, 13 greek islets not far from Turkey, a giant cemetery of ships has been found. The 22 wrecks, in an area of less than 50 square kilometers, are from classic and hellenistic time, dating among 700 – 400 B.C. and the 16th century.

    The sensational discovery was made by a team of greek and american archaeologists, coordinated by the University of Southampton, and is providing new interesting details on commercial routes and shipbuilding in ancient Mediterranean. Directions from local fishermen and divers helped the researchers in their work. This discovery is considered surprising not only for the great amount of wrecks found, but also because it is giving the opportunity to study an unexpected commercial route in the Mediterranean, far from the main ports of antiquity. The variety of loads is also astonishing, with amphorae, plates, pottery and jars.

    3.UNDERGROUND MONUMENT NEAR STONEHENGE – England

    MONUMENTO SOTTERRANEO NEI PRESSI DI STONEHENGE, Inghilterra

    MONUMENTO SOTTERRANEO NEI PRESSI DI STONEHENGE, Inghilterra

    Stonehenge, the neolithic site used by druids for celtic rituale near Amesbury in Wiltshire, in England, has a “new” rival. Three kilometers away, in Durrington Walls, another ceremonial centre dating to Stone Age has been found. The monoliths, dating to 4.600 years ago, have been located with non-invasive techniques like radars trailed by quads and haven’t been unearthed yet. The discovery was announced by Professor Vince Gaffney, chief of the team of experts who has worked to the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, carried out by the University of Birmingham and the Department of archaeological prospection and virtual archaeology of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute. Few meters below Durrington Walls are located more than 90 megaliths with a height of four meters, composing a C-shaped arena. The complex, 1,5 kilometers of circumference and surrounded by a ditch 17,6 meters deep, is considered by some archaeologists complementary to Stonehenge, while others believe there is no connection between the two sites.

    4. ETRUSCAN TOMB IN CITTA’ DELLA PIEVE – Italy

    TOMBA ETRUSCA CITTA’ DELLA PIEVE, Italia

    TOMBA ETRUSCA CITTA’ DELLA PIEVE, Italia

    Clarita Natalini (Superintendency of Umbria) and archaeologists Silvia De Fabrizio, Francesca Bianco, Benedetta Droghieri and Andrea Pagnotta, have discovered a necropolis, whose chambered tomb is made of a room dug in the ground and of an entrance corridor (dromos) and is a singularity in the territory. The quality of conservation of the findings, belonging to a famous family clan from Chiusi and dating around the 3rd century B.C. is extraordinary. The underground grave, dug in natural soil, has a rectangular room of about 5 square meters. Inside, two large sarcophagi are visible, one of them featuring a long etruscan inscription, referable to the identity of the deceased, besides two funerary urns with a recumbent male character. Inside the urns, made of particular materials like alabastrine marble (not found in the territory), organic matter like bones and ashes have been found. The sarcophagi are instead made of local sandstone.

    5. TOMBS OF THE NECROPOLIS OF KHALET AL-JAM’A – Palestine

    TOMBE DELLA NECROPOLI DI KHALET AL-JAM’A, Palestina

    TOMBE DELLA NECROPOLI DI KHALET AL-JAM’A, Palestina

    In may 2015, a small team from University “Sapienza” in Rome, directed by Lorenzo Nigro and coordinated on the field by Daria Montanari, was summoned by the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities (MOTA) of Palestine to help rescuing a necropolis, accidentally discovered during the construction works of a factory made by a french company, about 2,2 km southeast of the Church of Nativity, in the site of Khalet al-Jam’a. The joint italian-palestinian team located more than thirty tombs still intact within a burial area made of more than one hundred of them. In addition to the general plan of the necropolis and to two mayor cemeteries, one of the Bronze Age on the lower terrace of the hillside, the other of the Iron age, on the upper terrace, archaeological investigations revealed a Tower and a byzantine wine press. The rich objects from the tombs are made up of hundreds of ceramic vases and other precious findings. The main feature of the necropolis of Khalet al-Jam’a is its remarkable temporal extension. The oldest tombs date back to the last centuries of the third millennium B.C. and consist of wells with small underground rooms. Access to the graves was blocked by large stones placed at the passage between the well and the underground. The deceased were laid out on stretchers or platforms made of stone or mud-brick.

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